Why Generation Gaps Are About Attitude, Not Age

One of my mother’s biggest complaints in life? Old people! My mother is 86 years old.

For years she has complained about her friends wanting to eat dinner by 5:00 p.m. and be in bed by 8:00 p.m. When she travels, including trips to Hawaii and Europe within the past year or so, she is up early and awake late. She loves to attend concerts and events and often goes to the movies three or four times a week. Her favorite genre is foreign films. Most of her peers won’t go with her. They can’t read the subtitles, hear the sound and won’t pay the ticket price. In fact, one man-friend insisted on taking her to the “dollar-movie” because the sound was loud, the ticket was cheap — and the show ended before sundown. At my daughter’s wedding last summer, my mother was on the run before breakfast, walking and climbing at tourist attractions, and joining us for a late night cap. Her daily dose of activities and level of energy by far exceeds that of most 30-year olds, including her grandchildren! 

What’s my point? Generation gaps aren’t necessarily confined to age differences. A great deal of it has to do with attitude. Some people are old at 40. Others, like my mother, are still young at 86.

During a recent television appearance, I discussed why I called my book Geeks, Geezers, and Googlization. Initially, the words inferred young and old. But as I completed my research, I realized that geeks and geezers suggest more attitude than age. Click on the image below to view the segment where I discuss that age is just an attitude.

 

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